How to cut out the pattern for women’s pants

Sewing instructions for women’s pants:

Cutting the pattern

The front piece of the pattern for women’s pants includes both the pattern for a simple fly solution and a solution with a more complicated fly.

The pattern with the simple fly is cut as in picture A.
The complicated fly is made by cutting the pattern as in picture B.

The type B fly is more difficult to make but is more ‘jeans-like’ and has the option of being able to be made longer for men who require a longer opening. You will also need extra pieces for this fly.

Cut the front and back pieces on double layer of fabric like this.

Simple fly A, complicated fly BFront, back and waistband piece laid out on fabric
Add seam allowance (at least 1cm) to all edges and 2,5-3cm to the hems. Remember that you can measure and adapt the length of the pants legs to suit your leg length. Depending on your seating posture the pattern length can be more or less suited for you. If you want to make sure, cut the pants slightly longer than you need. It is easier to shorten the leg length than making them longer if necessary.

The waistband is cut as one piece unless the width of the fabric is too short. In this case you have to cut it in two sections (remember to add seam allowance to the edges) and then join it in the back.

If you are going to use the more complicated fly, add a few extra cm (around 5 cm) to the end of the waistband.
Extra parts 1 and 2The extra pieces on the pattern sheet for the complicated fly are cut x 1, e.g. on single layer fabric.

For the compicated fly cut one piece of extra part 1 and 2. These patter pieces need to be layed out on the front side of the fabric when being cut so the pieces are facing the right way for the pants. Remember to add seam allowance.

14 Responses to How to cut out the pattern for women’s pants

  1. anna obrien says:

    Sometimes my pants have a bag in front .What am i doing wrong

    • susanne says:

      You might need to shorten the front of the pattern or take it in in the sides. Try making a sample garment and adapt the general seated pattern from this

  2. janet says:

    I have a pair of straight legged pants. I want to take them in so they are boot cut
    Do I take in the in seam or the outer seam ?

  3. Diane Evans says:

    How do I make girls pants size 7

    • susanne says:

      Sorry, we don’t have any patterns for children and it isn’t covered in the brief of our present project. Unfortunately we need to stick to the brief as this is what’s being funded.

      Check out the adaptation part of the site and either make adaptations to ready-made pants or try using the solutions there to a pattern for walkies. I actually think the adaptations to ready-made pants are as good (better she whispered) than the patterns.
      Susanne

  4. ann says:

    Pls how do I curve d legs to get flair

  5. Kulsum says:

    Is front and back leg the same or back is wider

    • susanne says:

      Sorry for being missing in action . Now …

      They are just different in more ways than size.
      Susanne

  6. Betsy says:

    Can I cut down a size 12 pant and make it into a size 10 these pants have never been worn. women pants

    • susanne says:

      Sorry for being missing in action . Now …

      That might be a bit iffy as the back side of our pants are slightly curved. Try positioning the back pattern pieces on the back of your pant leg and the front pattern piece on the front of your pant leg. This might give you some guidance if it is possible. I doubt there is enough difference in size between 10 and 12 to give you the fabric you need. I would suggest you try adapting the back of the pants you have instead. Generally it is good to have a size bigger pants to do this adaption. You can chose adaption of back depending on body and pants type but they are all available under this head page http://en.fashionfreaks.se/adapting-ready-made-clothes/pants-adaptations/

      Susanne

  7. Valda says:

    when cutting out stretch fabric for pants ( linen with Lycra) should the stretch go lengthways or across?

    • susanne says:

      There’s different ways fabric can stretch, twoways or fourways. If you have a twoway stretch you want the stretch to go “across” not lenghtways. Linen with stretch lycra sounds nice. Good luck and sorry this comes a bit late.

  8. Vivienne says:

    If my long pants with 2-way stretch bon bon fabric is to be cut with stretch going ‘across’ – does this mean that the grainline is perpendicular to the selvage?

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